Being the best that we can be!

Being a human being… And a human doing!

It’s been a while since I’ve written here. I guess things have been busy and I’ve enjoyed being busy. However, the past few days have highlighted, perhaps reiterated more so, the influence we have as teachers on our kids. More so, the influence we all have on one another.

Be a Rockstar!

Trust is a big thing in any classroom, or environment, where ‘stuff needs to get done’! And believe, that the kids in your care will believe you and trust you, regardless of what you say. Why? Because of the high regard they hold you in.

We have a great buddies program at school, that I’ve mentioned before, where our Year 5 kids spend time with their Year 1 buddies, sharing stories, mini projects etc. Following on from our visit downstairs to their classroom, the kids come back buzzing. More so than most other activities and events that go on throughout the year. Why? Because of that fuzzy feeling they get when their buddy smiles at them, clinched to them, wishing for them not to go because of how much they adore them. “Your a Rockstar!” I tell them. To their buddy, they are the coolest person in the school bar none. The trust is well and truly there. In an international school where children come from all backgrounds and upbringings, it really is something special to behold.

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What spurred these thoughts on recently are a result of our Morality lessons which focus on 4 core values (pillars), one of which focuses on ‘The Community’. What I liked about these lessons, have been the emphasis on respect, empathy, tolerance and compassion. We also read about influential people like Dr. Martin Luther King JR and Rosa Parks who all faced adversity throughout their lives. Stories that we all know too well.

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The activity was simple. Using coloured stickers the children were given a colour, which was unknown to them, placed on their forehead. Some blue, some green, some yellow and one child red and one child purple. When the children were asked, they got into groups that were similar to them and no one else. They were also allowed to do as they pleased for the proceeding 3-4 minutes. Anyone not in a group (Red and Purple) had to isolate themselves from the groups and stand at the side at opposite ends of the room. Now, the children isolated had no idea what colour they were but soon figured they were different and didn’t have anyone to hang out with. The facial expressions and body language here are always remarkable. For the most part, the groups of children chatted and played about, not really taking into consideration anyone else. Towards the end of the allocated time two children, at different times, came to me and asked if they could join the two excluded kids. To which I shrugged my shoulders and so they took the initiative and did so.

The reaction of the two excluded kids was just incredible. The girl that approached the excluded girl, gave a hug and dragged her (who didn’t put up any resistance) into her group. The boy that approached the excluded boy, just chatted and shortly after, some of the other kids came over to include themselves in the discussion. It became one of those lessons where you didn’t have to do anything, explain anything, or hit home any message, as the kids just got it. They could relate to it instantly and afterwards applied it to their own day to day school life. It was one of those moments where you as a teacher sit back and just watch the pennies drop around you.

Post lesson, it’s one of those that you share with your peers as the feel good factor is something you want others around you to be a part of, but it’s something you really just need to see for yourself. I’m sure you probably have, or have done something similar. It just highlighted for me, as a teacher and as a role model for these kids, the impact I have on their lives. My treatment and expectations of them is consistent and communicated clearly. Why? Because it’s so important. It’s perhaps sometimes under emphasised when educating our children, and ourselves for that matter, the importance on developing relationships with one another and respecting each other. Holding each other in high regard, regardless of ‘what sticker is on their head’. I think society can mess with our minds a little bit on these values, because when I look at our Year 1 buddies when we come to visit, they think about nothing else but the current situation they are in, with their rockstar. Their rockstar can be from wherever in the world, believe in anything they wish to, and could have eaten all sorts for lunch, but they don’t care. For the time that they are with them, nothing else matters. For them, it’s about living in the now, with people they want to be with. People they trust. People they value.

Living as we should,

Treating others as we should,

Enjoying life as we should.

Ultimately, being the best version of ourselves we can be, for ourselves.

And seeing the incredible impact that has on others.

Be the best that you can be, and you’ll bring out the best in others too.

Be a Rockstar.

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